Twitter Gets Support for Emoji 5.0, Adds 69 New Emojis
Twitter Gets Support for Emoji 5.0, Adds 69 New Emojis
Twitter Gets Support for Emoji 5.0, Adds 69 New Emojis

Twitter has now received the support for Emoji 5.0 across platforms and this means that users will now be able to use all the latest emojis to express their feelings through the social media platform. While the new emojis have not shown up for everybody as yet, you can expect it to roll out gradually to all users on each major platform.

Bryan Haggerty, part of Twitter’s Design team, announced through a tweet on Tuesday that the company is introducing the support for all the new emojis and that it has updated its Twemoji open source repository on GitHub as well. This means that you will be able to post emojis including a woman with headscarf, face with raised eyebrow, exploding head, crazy face, face with monocle, face vomiting, shushing face, face with hand over mouth, breastfeeding emoji, and more through the platform.

Emojipedia notes that with the release, 239 new emojis have come to Twitter. However, after accounting for duplicates and skin tones, a total of 69 unique new images have been added. The new emojis will be available for users of Twitter.com on desktop and mobile, as well as TweetDeck and Twitter Stickers. Twitter app users on macOS, iOS, Android, and Windows will not see these updates, as these apps use native emojis for each respective platform, the report notes.

Notably, with Emoji 5.0, more gender-diverse options were added and as you can see from the examples mentioned earlier, diversity in terms of faith and other factors was also introduced. Emoji 5.0 brought along 137 new emojis in total.

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Hardly anybody will argue that emojis have now become an integral part of our communication and new emojis effectively mean more words can be replaced with ease. This replacement can be extremely useful on a word-limit bound social medium such as Twitter. This is why the introduction of new emojis can help users in expressing more feelings using fewer words. However, there will always be the argument that emojis can often be misinterpreted but that’s a discussion for some other day perhaps.